Rococo Inspired Weaving and Braiding

1

Rococo Inspired Weaving and Braiding by Carmi Cimicata for John Bead Corp and Perles et Cetera Fall 2016 Issue

When I think of rococo, the extravagant gowns and hairstyles of Marie Antoinette come to mind immediately. The Rococo style was coming to the end of its popularity at the same time support for the French monarchy died. Rococo styling had been featured in architecture, home décor and fashion, it was “just too much” and it was criticised for being superficial and ridiculous. In the end, I believe it showcased a style of living that few people could attain (we all know how it worked out for Marie Antoinette) and lead to a new movement, the Empire Style, that was simpler, free spirited and with less decoration.

1c 1b

Although Rococo appeared frivolous, it still included intricate patterns and designs. It also featured imagery of love and romance. With that style guide in mind, I decided to create some bracelets that would feature patterns derived by weaving and braiding with two classic royal colors: red and purple.

1d

Bracelet one is a woven pattern created on a new tool, the Beadalon Bracelet Weaver tool. Bracelet two is the same woven design, however it has been cut and embellished in an “over the top” manor. Bracelet three is a classic kumihimo 8-strand braid. Worn together they would be extravagant. However, in the words of Iris Apfel, “Most people say take one off: I say add one on.” This over-embellishment ideal is my own.

2

To create the weave for the bracelets I used the latest award-winning tool to be launched by Beadalon this year: the Bangle Bracelet Weaver. The metal base has three sets of holes, which ultimately creates three different sized bangles. I used the large size and set my warp pins into the outer circle of holes. The tool comes with wonderful step-by-step photo instructions and you can see a video demonstration on their YouTube channel explaining how to create fabulous wire and fiber bangles.

3

The first bracelet began with just a simple knot to tie my two rattail strands together and then I weaved.

4

It is a positively enjoyable process because you start to see your patterns quickly.

5

To make your weaving permanent, a length of fiber or wire is used to thread between your woven fibers next to the warp pins.

6

My finished bangle is lightweight since I used rattail and some cording to make it.

I then made a second identical bangle.

7

I needed to cut my second bangle open, so to ensure my weaving would not unravel I added lines of glue in two locations.

8

When the glue was completely dry I simply cut next to the glue lines.

9

I then attached my silver end caps with additional glue hiding those two unfinished cut sections.

10

With my bangle now flat, I was able to hand stitch some beads throughout. My open bangle was finished with a magnetic clasp and I chose to dangle to crystal heart pendants to the clasp with jump rings.

11

The third bracelet was created with my kumihimo disk and finishing components.

Together I have a set of bracelets, which can be worn on one or both arms. The addition of some beautiful Swarovski crystal hearts adds the romance factor I was seeking. Slider bails allowed me to attach a Swarovski heart pendant to the kumihimo bracelet and I experimented with both 3 and 5 bails. In the end I used one bail and attached my two other crystal hearts to the beaded bangle.

fb

This project appeared originally in French in the Fall 2016 issues of Perles et Cetera magazine.  They did a wonderful job photographing and showcasing the bracelets!

John Bead Corp Products Used

Bracelet One
Bangle Bracelet Weaver Tool
Red and Purple Rattail
Red Lovely Knots Cord

Bracelet Two
Bangle Bracelet Weaver Tool
Red and Purple Rattail
Red Lovely Knots Cord
Rectangle Kumihimo End Caps
Magnetic Closure
Jump Rings
Swarovski Pendant 6202 Heart
Miyuki 11.0 Seed Beads
Preciosa Red Ripple™ Beads

Bracelet Three
Dazzle-it Kumihimo Disk
Red and Purple rattail
End Cap and Closure set for Kumihimo
Pendant Bail Slider
Swarovski Pendant 6202 Heart
Jump Rings

Bangle Bracelet Weaver With Unique Fibers

10

This bracelet is beautifully woven and unique because of an easy to use new tool from Beadalon.

11

The fibers I used include our Lovely Knots 1mm cord along with a small ball of recycled sari yarn.

12

Kleshna’s Bangle Bracelet Weaver tool was launched in January and you will find a step by step photo how-to in the box detailing how to both set up and use the tool.  I also included a video tutorial at the end on this post.

13

You can see how my two very different fibers wove to create a gorgeous kaleidoscope of color.  I also used the Lovely Knots cord to sew the finished weaving together by running a needle next to the weft pins and following the Beadalon instruction.

14

 

This is a delightful one of a kind fiber bracelet.

Wired and Wild Beaded Nest!

 

Wired Flower By Nancy Donaldson

The fabulous wired nest was created by Nancy Donaldson.  It really is a shape that does not need a name.  It is all curves and twists and wild.

Wired Flower By Nancy Donaldson

It started out with some wire and beads.  What makes it unique is the component Nancy wired everything to.

26011514

Nancy used one of our flower maker components so this piece can immediately be strung onto a necklace.  She also used on of our unique cabochons (more information about hose soon) for the flower centre.

Vintage 50’s Necklace With A Kumihimo Twist

 

1a

Designed by Carmi Cimicata for John Bead Corp and Perles et Cetera Winter 2016 Issue. This is the English translation of the step by step that appeared in French in the current issue of the Magazine.

Kumihimo Kumihimo

This simple kumihimo disk has become the most loved tool in my studio. Made of foam, it is surprisingly sturdy. Kumihimo is an ancient braiding technique. Today, the classic 8-strand braid is easy to create with a variety of stringing materials. Most kumihimo disks come with instructions for this braid. Rattail is usually included because it the most common string used by kumihimo designers. It braids easily and is available in a wide selection of colours and several thicknesses.

4

I love the 8-strand braid and have tested it with virtually every stringing material I have in my stash.   Thick and thin lengths of cording combine to create the most elegant braids. They look complicated and unique. This really appeals to me as a designer.

5

To create the three tiered necklace I set up three completely different braids. My disk looked different each time. For one braid I used Neo Chain and classic kumihimo polyester rattail.

6

My second braid features several different thicknesses of cotton wax cord.

7

The third braid is especially unique with one extra thick piece of Nappa leather cord, soutache cord, cotton wax cord and rattail.

8

The color palette for these braids was influenced by the announcement of the 2016 Pantone Color of the year. This is the first time they have selected two colours; Rose Quartz and Serenity.

Pantone_Color_of_the_Year_2016_shop_Pantone_Swatch_Cards

2016 Pantone Color(s) of the Year.

Kumihimo

I glued my three braids into a special large kumihimo end cap. I made sure to let this cure overnight before adding my lobster clasp in order to ensure that the three braids were permanently in place.

10

I think the necklace looks lovely on it’s own. The chain I added to one of the braids adds a tiny bit of glitter.

11

However, what is life without a little extra embellishment? As a jewelry lover I also have quite a few of these vintage brooches in my collection.

12

I added this over the top rhinestone brooch and felt quite satisfied with the final necklace. The brooch is in place with just its pin back, so it is easy to remove, replace or switch out for a different color.

perles2

Here is how the necklace appears in the current issue of Perles Et Cetera.

Products Used from John Bead Corp.

Kumihimo Circle Disk

Dazzle-it Rattail

Dazzle-it Cotton Wax Cord

Metal Complex Napa Leather

Kumihimo End Cap #23820105-01

Lobster Claw

Quick Grip Glue

More Information

If you go to blog.dazzle-it.com you will see over sixty posts I have written featuring kumihimo.

If you would like to see a video demonstrating the classic 8-strand technique go to this link.

Retro Blooming Necklace

RETRO BLOOMING Necklace for CHA 2016

RETRO BLOOMING Necklace Workshop Created for CHA 2016

“Make a cutting edge leather necklace using components from the Tropical Punch line by John Bead Corp in association with Sizzix machines and brand new dies created by Jill MacKay.   Mixed media has never been this hip…until now!   A workshop literally to die for.”  Workshop by Carmi Cimicata

Soft Leather

This workshop was created to showcase our soft leather sheets and some of the unique components in the Tropical Punch jewelry making collection.  Since the workshop techniques were demonstrated in person, these pictures are a good summary of what you need to do in order to create something similiar.

cut1  RETRO BLOOMING Necklace for CHA 2016

The Retro Blooming Necklace stands out because of the layered leather blooms.  We were able to create and cut the flowers with special dies from the Jill Mackay collection. Thank you Sizzix for allowing us to use your new “Movers and Shapers” dies for workshop.

Tip – You will be able to die cut more flowers if you cut your leather into smaller shapes. There will be less waste. (see picture above)

RETRO BLOOMING Necklace for CHA 2016

You can cut as many flower shapes as you may want for your necklace. Some of my pieces are over the top with more than three layers. You may prefer far fewer flowers on your necklace.  Simply cut and build layers until you are satisfied with the groupings.

glue1

I used a tiny dab of glue between each flower layer to secure it in place.  For the layer on top I added the special circular bead.

RETRO BLOOMING Necklace for CHA 2016

The bead I used as the flower centre is a Preciosa Ripple™. I sewed mine with a tiny bead anchor to give my necklace more of a hand-finished appearance. RETRO BLOOMING Necklace

I only sewed through a single layer of leather.

RETRO BLOOMING Necklace

One good stitch with a knot holds the bead in place. Then I glued the layers of leather together. The Ripple bead covers the tiny hole in each flower and any possible glue seepage. (Notice where I added glue.)

NOTE: If you do not enjoy sewing, you can glue the bead in place too.

RETRO BLOOMING Necklace

I worked on a non-stick surface so I did not accidentally glue my leather flower to my table/work surface.

RETRO BLOOMING Necklace

I always let glue dry overnight if I can.  In a classroom setting, we are on the clock, so it was great to be able to use a fast glue such as Quick Grip for this project.

RETRO BLOOMING Necklace

 

To make the flowers wearable I used Tropical Punch polyester pipe for my necklace.

RETRO BLOOMING Necklace

I created the tiered look by cutting my pipe to the length I liked and taping it in place to maintain its shape.

RETRO BLOOMING Necklace

 

I added a pendant bail slider to my last polyester pipe cord before gluing on my end caps.

glue8

The bail slider allowed me to add this special lucite Tropical Punch flower to the necklace. Then I glued my leather blooms to the polyester pipe necklace so that the lucite flower was perfectly framed.

RETRO BLOOMING Necklace

If you do not like working with frayed ends (1),  you can tape your polyester pipe before cutting it (2)  or use a flame to seal the edges (3).

RETRO BLOOMING Necklace

The Tropical Punch endcap I picked has a deeper center, so I cut my cords into a triangular shape so that I could glue them properly into the cap.  This allowed the cords to sit side by side snuggly in the cap with glue.

RETRO BLOOMING Necklace

If you are working on a beading board, place a little masking tape under any area where you apply glue.  This way your project won’t accidently stick to the board if glue seeps out.

Your last step is to add a clasp.

Retro Blooming Necklace

I used these products from John Bead Corp.

Soft leather sheets – Retro Pink and Black Suede   75103102-05 + 75103100-00

Tropical Punch Polyester Pipe   75001000-01 (available in many colors)

Tropical Punch Findings   26002001-03

Tropical Punch Lucite Flowers   28400684-04

Pendant Bail Sliders   26002053-01

Bead Design Board   74530132

Quick Grip Glue

Czech Preciosa Ripple Beads  27800957-01s5

Global Chic Tapestry and Crystal

Global Chic Tapestry Cord Necklace by Carmi Cimicata and Nancy Donaldson

Global Chic Tapestry and Crystal Necklace for John Bead by CHA Designer Member: Carmi Cimicata

This week we are participating in a special blog hop with nearly 60 Craft and Hobby Association (CHA) members from around the world who are coming together to help us celebrate the CHA MEGA Show 75th anniversary.

76024008-11

Welcome to the John Bead blog if you are a new reader.  Our blog hop showcase will feature a unique new stringing material we recently released called Global Chic Tapestry Cord.  This wonderful cotton cord is filled with fiber allowing designers to sew it with ease.

Global Chic Tapestry Cord

I asked CHA designer Nancy Donaldson to play with the cord during a session in my studio.  She pinned the cord into marvelous shapes and twists.  She could see many wonderful designs from the moment she began to manipulate the cord.

DSC03064 copy

A few strategic stitches with a needle and thread held her curves in place permanently.

4

Our unique findings sets at John Bead include these endcaps.  Two tapestry cords can be glued snugly into the cap and the ends look professionally finished now.

Hot Fix Crystals

When the necklace was secure it was time to bring out some crystals.  John Bead has a very large assortment of hot fix crystals.  These gems have a special glue on their backside that need to be heated before the crystal is applied.

6

Some locations on my necklace allowed for a bigger crystal.  In other areas I wanted just a tiny glittery highlight.

7

I used a Hot Fix Applicator which comes with different tips to apply different sized crystals.

8

The crystals catch the light when you wear this necklace.  I love the contrast between the cotton fiber cord and the glittery crystal.

The entire Global Chic collection will be presented at the CHA show in January.  Stop by our booth to see it and our other finished jewelry samples.

Global-Chic

seeyouchablogbadge

Nearly 60 CHA members from around the world are coming together to help us celebrate the CHA MEGA Show’s 75th anniversary for a whole week – Monday, December 7 through Friday, December 11.  You’ll have plenty of chances to enter to win the $500 Visa gift card each day of the hop, on any of the participating blogs. Everyone is eligible to win, whether you’re in the U.S. or international.  Learn more and enter to win $500 by reading more here.

Their are just three entry options to win our $500+ Visa gift card:

1.  Leave a comment on your blog (mandatory) answering the question – “What is your favorite “can’t live without” craft supply or tool?”

2.  Tweet about the giveaway  (tweet text includes #CHAshow hashtag; can tweet daily for extra entries)
3.  Answer a multiple-choice poll about how often you “cre8time” for crafting  (double entry value)

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Leather and Lucite Summer Sensation Necklace

1

This is the “Leather and Lucite Summer Sensation Necklace” designed by Carmi Cimicata for John Bead Corp for the current issue of Perles Et Cetera magazine.

1

This magazine is published in French, so this is the English translation.

2

Soft leathers in a range of colors make it possible to create wearable jewelry with virtually no leather crafting skills. All you require is a desire to think creatively about a product normally shaped into purses or shoes. Leather is also normally associated with colder weather. Combining it with Lucite, which is perfect for hot summer days was a great challenge.

Leather is much thicker than fabric, requires no extra hemming and can be easily cut with many dies originally designed to cut paper.   My maple leaf shape could have been hand cut with scissors but I already had a paper cutting die that made this job take only a minute or two.

3

I stacked my leaves in an interesting pattern and lightly glued them together. I now had my new leather pendant. A little extra trimming gave me my new abstract shape.

4

I used a regular ribbon clamp to make my new leather pendant easy to add to my polyester pipe necklace.

5

The Lucite Hibiscus Bead Cap flowers are from the Dazzle-it Tropical Punch collection. I used a head pin to add my bead to the cap and created a loop so I could attach three of these to the pendant bail sliders with a jump ring.

5a

These special bails allow you to add components to braided cords featuring kumihimo and macramé techniques. They slide beautifully onto thick cords.

6

I glued a strip of leather onto my polyester pipe cord to keep the bail positioned at this height. It was like creating a little stopper.

7

Finally, a glue-in magnetic end cap finished my polyester pipe cord ends brilliantly. My necklace is lightweight and the perfect accessory for summer outings. With so many soft leather colors to choose from I can mix and match shapes for virtually any clothing ensemble.

Components Used

Metal Complex Soft Leathers

Ribbon Clamp

Tropical Punch Polyester Pipe Turquoise/Peach 5mm

Pendant bail sliders

Magnetic glue-in end cap

Tropical Punch Lucite Hibiscus Bead Cap and Lucite Beads

Jump rings in various sizes

Tools

Quick Grip Glue

Metal Complex leather scissors

Pliers

AccuCut Maple Leaf die and die cutting system

The Tropical Punch Blog Hop!

collage

Today we have the pleasure of sharing the work of many wonderful bloggers who were sent a Tropical Punch bag of goodies.  There were no rules for this hop. Tropical punch kits were sent to jewelers, paper artists and sewers. These designers were encouraged to create anything they would personally love.  The results are fabulous!

To read more about each project you can click on the link provided or the picture of the finished piece.  Join us by visiting each participant!

cindy

Tropical Punch by Cindy Goldrick.  Cindy is a first time blog hopper and wrote a wonderful post about her experience.  “When creating, I usually start with a pile of components that have some cohesiveness in colour but have a variety of textures, sizes and material. Inspiration can come at the strangest times, however, and this time was no exception. I’d been meditating on the hot, Brazilian Carnival colour of the beads I received and thought of the costumes that are worn in Carnival parades that reveal much but strategically cover important bits. One morning last week I woke up after seeing a net of these jewels in my mind and I knew that I would use the French knitter to showcase the beads. I also wanted to create a necklace that would be evocative of the sinuous vines that wind around trees in the jungle.”

Tropical Punch post by Cindy is linked here.  Part of Cindy’s article is also on the BeadFX blog linked here.

tammypowley

Tropical Punch by Tammy Powley.  “I was really fascinated with the polyester pipe that was sent as part of the package I received, and you can see that I included it in all three pieces I made. In one necklace, I used about 6 inches of it and then used beads, wire, and jump rings to add the center piece section and also the strap of the necklace.” When you pop over to Tammy’s post you’ll see a second necklace she created for the hop as well.

The Tropical Jewelry Design blog post by Tammy is linked here.

nancy

Tropical Punch by Nancy Donaldson.  Nancy regularly contributes projects to this Dazzle-it blog.  She was part of our internal team designing some Tropical Punch pieces with a Soutache twist for a UK runway show.  The pieces she designed for the hop are elegant and the added wirework is inspired.  You can see many of her projects for Dazzle-it in this link.

Nancy’s blog hop post is linked here.

suze

Tropical Punch by Suze Weinberg.  Suze accepted the Tropical Punch challenge willingly and with a few extra products in her kit completed three gorgeous necklaces.  “This was REALLY out of the box for me…I’m used to bezels and resin, so I loved this challenge. In my first experiment I wanted to use everything in sight!! I love the Brazilian flavor and bright colors.”

The “Loving Lucite” post by Suze Weinberg is linked here.

tenia

Tropical Punch by Tenia Nelson.  Tenia is a well established paper arts crafter. She is very new to jewelry and I wanted her in the hop because I just knew these products would be fun and easy to work with.  This necklace does not look like it was designed by a new jewelry maker at all!  Well done Tenia!

The link to Tenia’s blog is here.

IMG_8031 no lettering

Tropical Punch by Lisa Kettell.  Lisa wrote this about the blog hop kit we sent her “My package was filled with so much summer goodness. With the BoHo trend still rising this summer, I decided to create a fun summer BoHo statement necklace. The only thing extra I added were the fun tassels I made using neon floss.”  Lisa provided instructions on her post so you can make one too.

The link to Lisa’s blog post is here.

alma

Tropical Punch by Alma Stoller.  Alma is well known for her fiber art designs and online classes.  She wrote “I decided to make a necklace that was colorful, bohemian in style, but still consistent with the retro-Brazilian vibe of the Tropical Punch line. Using fabric with the Tropical Punch line of beads worked well. The beads are strong and colorful, and are a great way to embellish a variety of jewelry items.”

The link to Alma’s post is here.

img_9692

Tropical Punch by Laura Weed.  Laura may receive the over-achiever award for her project for our blog hop!  Proving that you do not need to be a jeweler to love these components, she turned the muslin bag we used to ship her products, into a new carryall!

The link to Laura’s post for Stampendous is linked here.

wendy

Tropical Punch by Wendy Price.  Wendy made two wonderful necklaces for the hop.  What stood out is her single petal necklace.  “I stamped the purple curved piece with a Stampendous image (SSC1196) in StazOn and then added dots of white nail polish. I attached organza ribbon to the chain and wired the stamped piece on.”  

Wendy’s blog post is linked here.